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  • photography tips if u can

    hi i have always loved photographs and photoshop but recently wanna take things more serious could someone explain wot the correct iso settings for diff shots would be and when to use and not to use a flash etc thanks a lot

  • #2
    Re: phototgraphy tips if u can

    What kind of shots are you interested in taking? Scenery/landscape, sports, portraits or ???

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    • #3
      Re: phototgraphy tips if u can

      Originally posted by andyrollins2007 View Post
      hi i have always loved photographs and photoshop but recently wanna take things more serious could someone explain wot the correct iso settings for diff shots would be and when to use and not to use a flash etc thanks a lot
      Andy, it is generally best to set the ISO on your camera to the lowest ISO it allows -- varies with camera (50, 100, 200 ISO). When we used film, the pro photographers shooting for National Geographic were usually shooting at 64 ISO. The film speed you choose depends on the lighting available to you, the subject(s) that you are photographing - (are they moving or still?), and the camera that you use. If you are shooting in low light (indoors or in the evening, etc.) and/or you are photographing subjects in motion -- sports or kids running around, then you will probably need to ADD light or ADD film speed or both. You need to raise your shutter speed to match the speed of your subjects, and as the shutter speed moves up, your need for light increases -- you can open your lens aperture wider to let more light in (but there is a limit to how wide you can go based on your camera lens and your need for depth of field (focus on things behind or in front of your subject). When your shutter is wide open and you still can not get a proper exposure, you need to add light either by raising your ISO speed (sensitivity to light) or use flash or added lighting. The higher the ISO, the more likely that your image will be noisy, if digital, or have more grain, if film.

      Frank Lopes put some links in his blog that explain some of the basic things we need to know when making images with our cameras, and ISO is one of them - take a look at his linked info:
      http://www.retouchpro.com/forums/blo...icalities.html

      What camera are you currently using, and like Danny asked - what do you want to photograph?

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      • #4
        Re: phototgraphy tips if u can

        Like Danny & CJ said, it depends on what you want to shoot and to some degree what camera you have. There are no hard and fast settings as it depends on the lighting and the effect you want to capture. You're generally shooting for a correct exposure, but even that is up to interpretation at times. You generally want some detail in the shadows and no blown highlights. Exposure is a balance of ISO, shutter speed, and aperture. These 3 items interact and changing only one will change the way the image looks. Throw in focal length and distance to main subject for a couple of other variables. In general tho :

        ISO - like CJ said, you want to use the lowest available. ISO = sensitivity to light. I use ISO100 practically 95% of the time. The other 5% is ISO400-1600 when I'm shooting candids around the house of my grandson. Lower ISO generally means less noise, but you need a slower shutter speed or wider aperture (smaller #'s). Higher ISO and you get by with a faster shutter or stopped down apertures (higher #'s), but get a little noisier. Some cameras anything over ISO400 gets so noisy the images are almost unusable. There are noise reduction programs/plugins that help although sometimes at the expense of detail.

        Shutter Speed (TV) - How long the shutter stays open. Faster speeds (1/125th or faster) will stop action, altho depending on the action it may take 1/500th or faster to freeze the action. Generally, slower than 1/60th will get motion blur if there is any movement. Also, handholding at 1/60th or slower may be blurred unless you have IS. For the slower speeds without IS you need a tripod. A good rule of thumb for what speed you can handhold without introducing blur is 1/focal length. Let's say your focal length is 200mm, then most people could get by with a TV of 1/250th. For 50mm it would be 1/50th. Some people are more steady than others and can get by with a slower and some need a faster.

        Aperture (AV) - size of the opening in the lens to let light pass thru. Smaller #'s (1.4, 1.8, 2.8) let a lot of light thru and are considered fast lenses. Your lens/camera may not be capable of those f-stops. Most lenses will go to f22 and the opening is very small. Depth of field plays in here. Distance to subject and AV can have a very different end result (focal length also plays in here). Let's say subject distance is 5' and AV of f1.8 and focal length of 50mm. Your depth of field (what will appear in focus) is about 2 inches. Same settings at 125mm and dof is razor thin. Now lets change the AV to f16 and at 50mm we get almost 2' and at 125mm we get about 3". Here's a link http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html that will let you input different settings and show your dof.

        Exposure = ISO + TV + AV. To remain constant more than one variable must change. Here is a link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exposure_value to exposure values and how they interact.

        If there is not enough light to let us use the settings we want/need to use then the only choice is to add light. Flash. Altho, if the subject is too far the range of the flash may not be enough to reach. There are times when you want to add a little fill flash so you set the flash to a lower power than full.

        Altho I've not read the book, I see a lot of recommendations for Bryan Peterson's "Understanding Exposure". I hope some of this helps.

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        • #5
          Re: phototgraphy tips if u can

          thanks for the help

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          • #6
            Re: phototgraphy tips if u can

            hey guys i generally take pics of people reptiles and love scenery i only have a samsung s730 but i have got a view nice pics from it ,but would love a canon 350d . im not sure wot the F 2.8 / 7.1 and 1/1500 to 1/8s is on my camera . its a 7.1 megapixel should i always take the pics in 7.1 mp also my sceneries seem lifeless

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            • #7
              Re: phototgraphy tips if u can

              sorry folks also when should u use a flash and if taking pics of movin objects do u always have to use the flash as images always go blurry thanks for help

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              • #8
                Re: phototgraphy tips if u can

                Originally posted by andyrollins2007 View Post
                hey guys i generally take pics of people reptiles and love scenery i only have a samsung s730 but i have got a view nice pics from it ,but would love a canon 350d . im not sure wot the F 2.8 / 7.1 and 1/1500 to 1/8s is on my camera . its a 7.1 megapixel should i always take the pics in 7.1 mp also my sceneries seem lifeless
                Originally posted by andyrollins2007 View Post
                sorry folks also when should u use a flash and if taking pics of movin objects do u always have to use the flash as images always go blurry thanks for help
                I wasn't familiar with your camera so had to do a little searching for the s730 manual to find out what's available. You're kind of limited in some settings available, but I'll try to explain what some of it means.

                It is a 7.2 mega-pixel and yes, I would recommend always shooting in the highest resolution available. It gives you room to crop, if needed, and also if you ever want to print something of size.

                Focal length is 35-105mm (35mm equivalent). Not too bad of a range for what you shoot. 35mm at the wide end is not too bad, it's just starting to get into the wide area. The 105mm at the long end is not gonna let you reach out there and get a long shot in the distance.

                Aperture range is pretty limited if I've read the specs right. At the wide angle (35mm) your range is f2.8 (good) to f7.1 (not good). At the tele end (105mm) it goes from f4.9 (not good) to f12.4 (getting there). f2.8 will let a lot of light in and let you use a faster shutter speed. However, as soon as you zoom in from the 35mm setting your light decreases and if you're zoomed in at 105mm you're only getting f4.9 which means you're gonna have to slow the shutter speed (or increase the ISO setting). With the smaller sensor more will be in focus at f7.1 and f12.4 than if you're shooting with a dslr.

                Shutter speeds available are 1 second to 1/1500th second in modes other than manual. If shooting in manual mode you have 8 seconds to 1/1500th. That should do you plenty well.

                You do have ASR which is Samsung's version of IS (Image Stabilization) which will help if the shutter speed drops to around 1/60th or slower. Not sure how good it is, haven't heard anything about it.

                There are 2 settings in your recording mode that you might want to play around with and see if they help your lifeless sceneries. Check to see what Sharpness & Contrast settings are on. You might try Vivid for sharpness and High contrast to see how that look.

                As to the flash and moving objects. No, you do not have to use flash, just a fast shutter speed, at least 1/125th and up to 1/500th depending on the type of movement. If you're shooting at 1/60th and slower, the flash will freeze the subject, but ambient light will also play into it and trying to handhold (without your ASR) will probably result in blur.

                Post a couple of pics with the problems you're stating and the exif settings intact or at least posted with the shot itself. This will help in determining what caused the problem you're talking about.

                Hope this helps a little.
                Last edited by D Thompson; 11-26-2007, 10:22 PM.

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                • #9
                  Re: phototgraphy tips if u can

                  hi there people heres two pics of the problems im getting when taking pics these are prob my to iggest problems any help would be great http://i223.photobucket.com/albums/d...s/S7301034.jpg
                  http://i223.photobucket.com/albums/d...s/S7301073.jpg

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: phototgraphy tips if u can

                    Originally posted by andyrollins2007 View Post
                    hi there people heres two pics of the problems im getting when taking pics these are prob my to iggest problems any help would be great http://i223.photobucket.com/albums/d...s/S7301034.jpg
                    http://i223.photobucket.com/albums/d...s/S7301073.jpg
                    Your shutter speed is way, way too slow for handholding or anything with movement. The first shot is 1/8th and the second shot is a full 1 second. Even if you could handhold at those speeds, if there is ANY movement it will be blurred. Get you shutter speed up to 1/80th or faster. Also, the first one was ISO 800 so you'd probably have to use flash. The other was ISO 100 so you'd probably have to raise ISO and add flash to get a fast enough shutter speed.

                    Hope this helps a little.

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                    • #11
                      Re: phototgraphy tips if u can

                      Thanks very much dennis I really want to uy a new camera wot do u think of a canon 300d or 400d

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                      • #12
                        Re: phototgraphy tips if u can

                        I've not used either of these, but from what I've read they are very capable. Basically considered entry level dslr and either should be good. There is a bit of a learning curve when jumping into the dslr world, but nothing too complicated and it just takes a little time. A lot depends on your budget and then which lens you put on it. The dslr world "can" get expensive. The kit lens is generally the efs 18-55mm f3.5-5.6 and will add about $100 to the cost of the body. Not too bad of a lens for the money. Some get the ef 17-85. You hear good and bad about both.

                        The differences that I'm aware of are :
                        XT - 8mp XTi - 10mp. Not a huge difference, the 10mp will give room to crop and may be able to print just a bit larger. My 20D is 8mp and I've printed 20x24 with no problem.

                        Focus points : XT -7 XTi - 9. Again nothing deal breaking here. I typically select my focus point, so this is a moot point to me.

                        LCD : XT - 1.8" with 115,000 pixels XTi - 2.5" with 230,000. XTi is clear winner here. Very nice improvement.

                        There may be some other improvements in the XTi as it's newer. It'd be best to go to the store and hold them. A whole nother world opens up in the lens department.

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