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  • Depth Of Field Scale

    My friends, "as John McCain would start a sentence" I would like to use the depth of field scale on all my lenses to capture a scene where sharpness is rendered from foreground, to horizon. I always wondered how those media photographers created sharp images without looking through a viewfinder by holding a DSLR above their heads to take shots, until I read that they use the depth of field scale. My aim is to create storytelling compositions, and I have learned that focus is always a factor. My gear consist of the Nikon D80, AF Nikkor 70-300mm 1:4-5.6G, Sigma DG 28-70mm 1:2.8-4, and Nikon 50mm f/1.4D AF Nikkor lenses. Also, is it possible to use this scale on all the lenses I've listed? I have sneaky suspicion that the different focal lengths of all listed lenses, have different dynamics in attaining sharpness from foreground to horizon. By all means, please explain. Thanks

    "Truth is the light illuminating my images"

    "Better to do something imperfectly than to do nothing flawlessly." - Robert Schuller
    "You don't take a photograph, you make it." - Ansel Adams

  • #2
    Re: Depth Of Field Scale

    IMHO, the best way to achieve depth-of-field depth is to use a large number, which equals a small hole, i.e. F-22 or 16 at whatever shutter speed the camera's meter dictates. Turn off image stabilization and put the camera on a tripod. Focus about 1/3 further back than the closest part of the picture you want in focus. The infinity part usually takes care of itself.

    I wish I had a diagram drawn to show you rather than try to use words to explain hyperfocus. I do hope this somewhat convoluted explanation helps.

    The hyperfocus technique will work on any of the lenses you have mentioned.

    Here is a link to a better explanation. http://www.dofmaster.com/hyperfocal.html

    Janet

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    • #3
      Re: Depth Of Field Scale

      it's simply a matter of moving the actual focus to the fstop marking on your lens which makes the image appear blurry if you look the the viewfinder..say for example you focus on an object and you are shooting at f/11, simply note the distance indicated on the lens and turn the lens so that same number now falls on f/11 on the DOF scale, this increases your DOF in front of your object without having to move the camera...

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      • #4
        Re: Depth Of Field Scale

        Janet Petty, and pixelzombie, thank you so much for giving me some clarity, and a great jump off point, in understanding what I have requested. You guys here, really are the greatest!!! Anyway, I have to get back to work now, but I will most certainly look into all that you have stated here, later @ home.

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        • #5
          Re: Depth Of Field Scale

          i hope it made sense, it's harder to explain in print than show someone in person...

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          • #6
            Re: Depth Of Field Scale

            Originally posted by pixelzombie View Post
            i hope it made sense, it's harder to explain in print than show someone in person...
            What pixelzombie said!

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            • #7
              Re: Depth Of Field Scale

              Most digital lenses have no DOF scale. There is a company @ www.expoimaging.net that sells some "Depth of Field Guides" in the form of little flat plastic discs that can be used to calculate and they work well. This is not a "must have", but I find it useful from time to time.

              I also bought a laser "tape measure that allows you to direct a beam at a target and get an accurate reading on distance (not to be used on living creatures). Worth having.

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              • #8
                Re: Depth Of Field Scale

                Direct link here:

                http://www.expoimaging.net/product-d...of-Field_Guide

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