Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Just got Epson Perfection 2450!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Just got Epson Perfection 2450!

    WOW! What a nice machine. Im really pleased with the true scans Im getting. There appears to be no change in the image from the real thing to the computer then out again. And at 2400 dpi! Plus the slide scans are great also. Certainly adaquate for most enlarging work up to about 8x10. I have what I consider a almost perfectly focused shot in 35 and that enlarged to 16x20 with no problem. I think the main factor is the focus of the slide and height above the flatbed that the scanner focuses. I think that may vary with each machine. It seems that a high dollar machine would come with a way to adjust the flatbed altitude for a perfect focus. But mine seems fine.

    Im curious, what dpi do most people start with for restoration work. My habit is twice the print dpi. If my printer prints at 314 then I will scan at 628, do the work at 628 the downsize. Is this a good idea? What advise does anyone have. The only reason I work at higher rez's is to allow enlargements or other possible future uses that I cant think of at the time.

    Tex
    Last edited by TheTexan; 07-21-2002, 11:22 PM.

  • #2
    Hmmmm. No responses.

    Well right or wrong, this is what I do.

    My scanner is an older Epson 1200U.

    I have no experience with slides but a standard 4x6 or 5x7 I'll scan at 300ppi. If there is a chance they may be enlarged to anywhere near an 8x10 I'll scan at 600 ppi.

    This method works fine with my Epson 1270 inkjet and has produced some very nice prints.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi Texan,
      Welcome to Retouch Pro. Excellent review on the Epson2450. I have the 1650 Photo and I love it. For the price I think you can't go wrong with Epson products.

      As to what dpi I scan at, it's usually around 300. Unless I know I will be printing poster size prints which is next to never. However, I am no expert on what resolution to scan at so don't take that as a an advice of authority.
      DJ

      Comment


      • #4
        I just saw this thread. Here's a site that has a lot of good scanning information.

        This is a page on the site that deals with your question. Read this page, then go to the next page for color printers. Enjoy!

        Ed

        Comment


        • #5
          Someone will probably yell at me for posting this in the "wrong" section or something, but this seemed the ideal time to ask this question:

          When you guys who scan and retouch or rework photographs do so, and have worked your magic and want to give your "customer" a quality product do you print it on your Epson on glossy paper or do you take it somewhere and have the digital made into a photo somehow? Just curious what the "last step" is...I think I understand everything up to that.

          Comment


          • #6
            Oh - I meant to ask also of you Epson people if you have a way around the "problem" of epson printers leaving such a large gap at the end of the paper. I have thought of telling the printer the paper is larger than 8.5 x 11 and seeing if I can get it to print closer to that edge, but haven't yet. Any thoughts?

            Comment


            • #7
              I think there have been a few discussions on that topic in the input/output forum. Here's one such thread. You'll probably find others in that forum as well.

              Ed

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks Ed! That was helpful!

                Now about the Epson gap at the end question...

                Comment


                • #9
                  I print on my Epson and for alot of the paper sizes I can print with no margins. It makes it nice. But even without that feature the printable space is a margin of 3 mm on top and sides with 14 mm at the bottom. That's on the 2000 P so I can't say much for the other Epson printers.
                  DJ

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Tex - Regarding the focus of the Epson 2450- I found that the scanner has a pretty large depth of field. Over in the Scanned Objects thread I devised a little test (image is here) to determine how far from the scanner bed the 2450 can focus...the results were pretty impresive! Some higher end scanners do have the ability to focus but you have to pay a great deal more for that ($10k and up!)...especially for a flatbed.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DJ Dubovsky
                      I print on my Epson and for alot of the paper sizes I can print with no margins. It makes it nice. But even without that feature the printable space is a margin of 3 mm on top and sides with 14 mm at the bottom. That's on the 2000 P so I can't say much for the other Epson printers.
                      DJ
                      I don't really speak mm very well, but that sounds like what I get...a larger gap at the end than on the sides. Everyone I know who has an Epson seems to print that way. Can it be "tricked" into running the print out farther, say by telling it that the paper is actually 8.5 x 12 or something? I would just as soon not waste lots of ink and time in trying this if someone has already done so and can tell me if it works and what the dimensions are...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The only way I can think of is if you have roll paper.
                        DJ

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Im sorry, I didnt realize that I posted this in the wrong place. I was wondering why it wasnt getting any responses. Now I know.

                          Personally, now, Im taking my files to a lab and use their 10000 dye sub printer to print the image. It looks like a photograph.

                          There are also photo printers that will actually expose a photo film sheet from the computer image thus actually giving you a true photograph. I havent used that yet. That seems like overkill seeing how the other printers produce virtually identical results. Certainly good enough for most clients needs.

                          Tex

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Epson 2450 negative scanning probs

                            When I scan a negative, it doesn't seem to come out as clear as the prints do on the 2450. The objects in the picture appear blurred. anyone else had this problem?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Epson 2450 negative scanning probs

                              Originally posted by chiquitita
                              When I scan a negative, it doesn't seem to come out as clear as the prints do on the 2450. The objects in the picture appear blurred. anyone else had this problem?
                              Yes Chiquitita. This is the one time Silverfast comes in so handy. It does an excellent job interpreting colour negatives and presenting them with beautiful realistic colours. I find the Epson Twain job on negatives to be less than satisfactory. For regular flatbed and 35mm slides my Epson 2450's native software is excellent.

                              Comment

                              Loading...
                              Working...
                              X