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  • Ed_L
    Yet another hard drive question
    by Ed_L
    After I installed the new 60 gig hard drive, the computer would only recognize 32 gigs. My son-in-law, who is quite good with computers, came over last night, and he found that I put a jumper on the hard drive that shouldn't have been there. After removing the jumper, the full 60 gigs showed up. Today,...
    10-02-2002, 06:08 PM
  • Sharon
    2nd Hard Drive
    by Sharon
    I am looking into getting a 2nd hard drive for my computer. I heard that it was best to put Windows Virtual memory and PS’s Scratch Disk on the 2nd hard drive. How do you have your 2nd hard drive set up?

    Thanks.
    Sharon
    07-17-2002, 12:29 AM
  • Ed_L
    Photoshop Speed
    by Ed_L
    I'm not sure if this was a fluke, or if it's always that way....but! I just installed a second hard drive. Previously, of course, I had my scratch disk on the primary (only) hard drive. After installing a second drive, I set aside a partitioned 5 GB for my scratch disk. My primary (original) drive has...
    09-23-2002, 09:56 AM
  • chris h
    IDE/ATA Hard Drives
    by chris h
    Am I right in assuming you can mix IDE and serial ATA hard drives on a motherboard that is equipped for both?
    03-22-2004, 10:30 AM
  • Sanda
    And anotrher hard drive question.
    by Sanda
    I bought a 40gig hard drive to replace my dead 20gig one. I didn't have the old one partitioned but was wondering if I should partition this one. If so what size partitions should I use? I'm running win98.
    10-12-2002, 05:52 AM
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  • Hard drive question

    Not knowing much at all about computers, I have a question about hard drives. I'm considering buying a second hard drive, and I have 512 MB DDR Ram installed in my Dell computer. The Ram is listed as PC 2100. I've seen hard drives advertised as 5400 rpm and PC 133. There is another advertised as 7200 rpm and PC 100. I'm thinking that the faster the rpm, the faster the hard drive, but I'm also thinking that the PC 100 is capable of transferring 100 MB per second, and the PC 133 goes at 133 MB per second. Is that right??? If so, and I had to choose one or the other of the ones mentioned, which one would I be better off with? Would there be a noticeable difference? More questions to follow.

    Ed

  • #2
    Ed, you definitely want to go for the rpms. The other numbers refer to the bus speed, and it doesn't matter how fast the bus speed is, the CPU will always have to wait for the hard drive to find the data. The faster the drive spins, the faster it can pass the data to the bus.

    Remember, the hard disk is a mechanical device.

    Luck...

    Comment


    • #3
      In speed terms about the blink of an eye Ed. I do usually get the faster option but I'm probably wasting my money which is better spent on Ram.

      Comment


      • #4
        I have never heard hard drive bus speed referred to as "PC 100"...am I just out of touch? I always heard "Mode 5, Ultra ATA" etc... as referring to transfer speed. Do these two terms refer to the same thing?

        Comment


        • #5
          I think we're talking apples and oranges here.

          Ultra ATA-133 refers to the maximum hard disk data transfer rate of 133 Mbytes/sec. Look for the seek times in the spec. sheet. The lower the seek time the faster the hard drive.

          PC-2100 refers to the ram theoretical transfer rate.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for the replies folks. Now I know what to look for. Greg, I told you I knew little about computers . It was probably ATA 100, and ATA 133. (okay, what does "ATA" stand for?) Sorry for the mixup.

            Ed

            Comment


            • #7
              Two generalizations about hard drive speed (ie there are exceptions):

              RPMs are directly proportional to noise. Slower drives are quieter.

              RPMs are inversely proportional to reliability. Faster drives are much harder to keep cool, which means they have more early deaths.


              I've used 10,000 rpm SCSI drives on my lab systems and found that they are noisy, and get very hot, even in a seperate case with extra fans. The new 15,000 rpm drives seem to be more of the same.

              My own preference is for IBM 5400 rpm drives for the majority of my storage, since they run quiet and cool. If I had a bit more money, though I'd have one of the 15,000 rpm drives for a scratch disk...

              --tks

              Comment


              • #8
                Advanced Technology Attachment (ATA)

                Also known as Ultra DMA, ATA is generally the least expensive hard drive interface; many computer motherboards include ATA controllers and cable connectors that typically control the "C" drive that contains the operating system.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Wow! Knowing something like that almost makes me a nerd! Thanks for the reply.

                  Ed

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    What do you hope to gain or do better or what problem(s) are you trying to solve?

                    The answers will affect shopping options.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      At present time, I have a computer with a 40 gig hard drive (my main 'puter). I also have another with a 5 gig, and a 20 gig hard drive. I am now using my 20 gig drive (5400 rpm) for storage of images, etc. I would like to get another hard drive for my main computer to use for image storage and scratch disk (unless there's a problem with this), then use the 20 gig for backup.

                      Ed

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        One of the things I've found to make a huge difference from one drive to another is the amount of cache ram onboard. I think it's Maxtor that currently has a 7200rpm drive with 8meg of onboard ram. It has the suffix "jr" which stands for Jumbo Ram.

                        It's recently bumped IBM off the lists of at least two magazines editor's choice lists, due to ongoing problems with IBM reliability.
                        Learn by teaching
                        Take responsibility for learning

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                        • #13
                          Ah, and I thought I knew what I needed to know! Thanks for the tip.

                          Ed

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Doug, I believe that IBM has sold its storage division. So much for reliability. Too bad because for years IBM had the best hard drives out there.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I've moved into the Maxtor camp after a new IBM drive faded away on me.

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