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  • Painter IX5 Advice

    Need some input from those using Painter IX5.

    My thing is not brush and palette, I leave that up to my artist brother.

    I want to know if Painter IX5 allows you to paint other than with brushes from scratch, similar to Gertrudis.

    Is there a steep learning curve etc.? Any info you can give, as I have a chance to save a little money on the purchase now.

    There are tutorials that I have seen that allow you to use filters, clone brushes etc, in IX5 but I never did get anything decent out of Painter Elements 3. So I need comments on IX5.

    All help appreciated.

    Steve

  • #2
    With the exception of very few members, Raniday and Kiska maybe (but I haven't seen them around for a while) nobody actually Paints much.

    Usually folks will just use the clone brushes to copy and "artify" an existing photographic image. If you have used the Art-History brush in Photoshop it's pretty similar (but a lot easier).

    Cloning in Painter (IX) is very easy, there is a Quick Clone feature that sets everything up for you.
    You do have to learn how to manipulate the brush parameters, but for any one who has been around Photoshop for a while that's no problem. Besides "Size" and "Opacity" the new guys are "Resat", "Bleed" and "Feature".

    Resat: is how much "paint" you're going to pick up from the original;
    Bleed: is how much a new paint stroke will mix with the old;
    Feature: for a bristle brush this will control the bristle density.

    On the other hand if you just want to try something different - but which can give results often as good as Painter, then try Deep Paint 2 - which is free.
    It is a discontinued product, there is no official support, but if you run into any problems just ask around here. Quite a few members have already used it.


    (oops, I wrote about Photoshop - now I saw that you are using PSP.)
    Last edited by byRo; 09-14-2006, 12:08 PM.

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    • #3
      Hi Steve. I use Painter quite a bit and like it a lot. It took a while to get use to, but uses layers, opacity etc. As Ro mentioned, it has a quick clone feature, where you get tracing paper turned on and puts you in the clone brushes. These clone brushes are a good place to start, since the choice of brushes is overwhelming at first for a non-artist. Almost all the brushes can be used to clone.) I like the textures and image luminance effects a lot. It is not quick, since you are making each stroke but I sure am glad I persevered. Gives a much more arty look than filters. Hope this helps - MargaretM

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      • #4
        Yes, PSP is my basic software. but also have PS 6. Got it for the PS tutorials I run into a lot. Also some good actions are floating around. Anyway I am familiar with the tools in PS pretty much altho I don't profess to be able to use it like I can PSP.

        Since I used Painter Essentials 3 and got nowhere, how will IX5 compare?

        I will probably use the cloning mostly, especially at first. I often do touch-up with brushes on images, but don't do a lot of brush work.

        Thanks for a lot of very good advice. I'll take a peek at Deep Paint, if it's not a "paint from scratch" program then it might work for me.

        Your thoughts are much appreciated.

        Steve

        Originally posted by byRo
        With the exception of very few members, Raniday and Kiska maybe (but I haven't seen them around for a while) nobody actually Paints much.

        Usually folks will just use the clone brushes to copy and "artify" an existing photographic image. If you have used the Art-History brush in Photoshop it's pretty similar (but a lot easier).

        Cloning in Painter (IX) is very easy, there is a Quick Clone feature that sets everything up for you.
        You do have to learn how to manipulate the brush parameters, but for any one who has been around Photoshop for a while that's no problem. Besides "Size" and "Opacity" the new guys are "Resat", "Bleed" and "Feature".

        Resat: is how much "paint" you're going to pick up from the original;
        Bleed: is how much a new paint stroke will mix with the old;
        Feature: for a bristle brush this will control the bristle density.

        On the other hand if you just want to try something different - but which can give results often as good as Painter, then try Deep Paint 2 - which is free.
        It is a discontinued product, there is no official support, but if you run into any problems just ask around here. Quite a few members have already used it.


        (oops, I wrote about Photoshop - now I saw that you are using PSP.)

        Comment


        • #5
          RP is the place to be if you need advice.

          Thanks for your comments on the program.

          It looks good from the tutorials I have read, and from a friend of mine who is really doing some nice things with it after a really short time.

          He and I both tried Painter Essentials 3 and hated it. I didn't manage to get a single image that I liked enough to keep. So that makes me a bit leery of anything with Painter from Corel in the name.

          Thanks again.

          Steve

          Originally posted by MargaretM
          Hi Steve. I use Painter quite a bit and like it a lot. It took a while to get use to, but uses layers, opacity etc. As Ro mentioned, it has a quick clone feature, where you get tracing paper turned on and puts you in the clone brushes. These clone brushes are a good place to start, since the choice of brushes is overwhelming at first for a non-artist. Almost all the brushes can be used to clone.) I like the textures and image luminance effects a lot. It is not quick, since you are making each stroke but I sure am glad I persevered. Gives a much more arty look than filters. Hope this helps - MargaretM

          Comment


          • #6
            Steve, I started using Painter recently and I like it. The program was designed to emulate the traditional artistic media; it is doing a pretty good job…at least much better then Photoshop brushes. It is a pretty complex program; I’m barely scratching the surface so far; it will take some time to get to terms with the soft.
            You can download a trial version from Corel cite…

            Pavel

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks for your input.

              I am just trying to avoid programs for folks who like to paint from scratch. I get nowhere this way.

              Since the program allows you to do this or "paint" by other means...cloning etc...then it might be a good purchase for me.

              Although my PC will handle them with no trouble, I always hesitate to install programs of that size, then try to get it all off my hard drive if I don't want to use it. Can be a pain sometimes. So I try to get as much info from users as possible before buying.

              Appreciate the help.

              Steve

              Originally posted by pavel123
              Steve, I started using Painter recently and I like it. The program was designed to emulate the traditional artistic media; it is doing a pretty good job…at least much better then Photoshop brushes. It is a pretty complex program; I’m barely scratching the surface so far; it will take some time to get to terms with the soft.
              You can download a trial version from Corel cite…

              Pavel

              Comment

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