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  • PS>Edit>Color Settings>Grey

    Photoshop CC v 20.0.3 | MacOS Mojave 10.14.3

    PS>Edit>Color Settings>Working Spaces> Grey
    There is a dropdown menu to choose from several including Grey Gamma 2.2 (Mac) but Dot Gain 20% appears to be the default.
    Is that the optimum/max quality grayscale working space when converting from RGB images ?

  • #2
    The Grayscale working space pop-up seen below the CMYK pop- up is where you pick our preferred Grayscale working space. This selection allows the option of picking five dot gain settings or two settings based on gamma (1.8 and 2.2). The two basic modes, gamma or dot gain,are selected depending on the desired use of the Grayscale document. The gamma setting is for defining Grayscale documents that will be output to some display system or viewed on the World Wide Web. A TRC gamma of 2.2 would be most appropriate for viewing. If the document is intended for print, you can pick a dot gain setting. Dot gain settings are for Grayscale documents that will be output to some kind of printer where the dot gain is a known value. It is possible to use a dot gain setting for viewing Grayscale images or a gamma setting for printing Grayscale images. However, in most situations, try to pick a setting based upon print or screen usage.

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    • #3
      So for websites and other online viewing - gamma 2.2 (Im on a Mac) ?

      if the intention is to print the photographs either continuous tone c-prints, or arrival inkjet, at a lab then leave it at the default Dot Gain 20% ?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by frankg View Post
        So for websites and other online viewing - gamma 2.2 (Im on a Mac) ?

        if the intention is to print the photographs either continuous tone c-prints, or arrival inkjet, at a lab then leave it at the default Dot Gain 20% ?
        If the web browser is color managed, doesn't matter. Otherwise 2.2 for Mac and Windows.
        None of the other printers you speak of are those that would use a gray dot gain conversion; they are all printers expecting RGB data in an RGB working space or better, an output color space from a supplied ICC output profile.

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        • #5
          Thanks for clarifying.

          Lastly, some of the canned Black and White profiles built into Adobe Camera Raw do not have equal RGB values. They're tinted / toned. If one likes the contrast and tonal range of a particular profile, what is the best and quickest way to 'neutralize' the RGB values before saving as a tif to open and edit in Photoshop
          Last edited by frankg; 03-04-2019, 09:08 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by frankg View Post
            Thanks for clarifying.

            Lastly, some of the canned Black and White profiles built into Adobe Camera Raw do not have equal RGB values. They're tinted / toned. If one likes the contrast and tonal range of a particular profile, what is the best and quickest way to 'neutralize' the RGB values before saving as a tif to open and edit in Photoshop
            Right, toning (like sepia) isn't intended to be neutral. And NONE of this in LR has anything to do with grayscale or gray gamma/dot gain. LR and ACR are 100% RGB engines. IF you wish to neutralize, then move saturation down to -100. Still RGB, no color cast. Then export from LR into whatever RGB working space (sRGB, Adobe RGB etc) you desire. Done.

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            • #7
              to neutralize, then move saturation down to -100

              Got it. I had erroneously thought to change mode to greyscale and then back again to rgb

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              • #8
                Originally posted by frankg View Post
                to neutralize, then move saturation down to -100

                Got it. I had erroneously thought to change mode to greyscale and then back again to rgb
                No reason to do so, depending on the source data, a good way to introduce data loss and banding. And depending on what's selected for the Mode change, not going to produce the same results as simply staying in the original color space and desaturating everything.

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                • #9
                  Thanks again

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